HAPPY ST PATRICK'S DAY

 

   

 

 

Tuesday, August 02, 2016 01:38:03 PM

I was married on St Patrick's Day. I was also baptised before the wedding ceremony and confirmed two  weeks later at the Easter Vigil and my Confirmation name is Patricia and Patricia was my sponsor. We have been married  29 years and now you can see why St Patrick's has a great meaning for me. My late mother-in-law was named Kathleen and she had Irish blood is in her family, so I gave the music to this page to match her name. I dedicate this page to her.

 

Sayings 

May God grant you always
A sunbeam to warm you
A moonbeam to charm you
A sheltering Angel
So nothing can harm you
Laughter to cheer you
Faithful friends near you
And whenever you pray
Heaven to hear you.

May your pockets,
 and your heart light. 
May luck pursue you
Each morning and night.

May you always have
Walls for the winds,
A roof for the rain,
Tea beside the fire,
Laughter to cheer you,
Those you love near you,
And all your heart might desire!

May you be in
Heaven a half hour before the
Devil knows you're dead!

When Irish eyes are smiling,
Sure it's like a morning spring.
You can hear the angels sing
When Irish hearts are happy
All the world seems bright and gay
And when Irish eyes are smiling
Sure, they steal your heart away.

May your blessings outnumber
The shamrocks that grow,
And may trouble avoid you
Wherever you go.

There are many good reasons for drinking,
One has just entered my head.
If a man doesn't drink when he's living,
How in the hell can he drink when he's dead?

May the best day of your past
Be the worst day of your future.

I'm looking over a four leaf clover
That I overlooked before
One leaf is sunshine, the second is rain,
Third is the roses that grow in the lane.
No need explaining the one remaining
Is somebody I adore.
I'm looking over a four leaf clover
That I overlooked before.



May you live to be a hundred years
With one extra year to repent.

May those who love us, love us
And those who don't love us,
May God turn their hearts
And if he can't turn their hearts,
May he turn their ankles
So we will know them by their limping!

As you slide down the banister of life,
May the splinters never point in the wrong direction!

May luck be our companion
May friends stand by our side
May history remind us all
Of Ireland's faith and pride.
May God bless us with happiness
May love and faith abide..

May your neighbours respect you,
Troubles neglect you,
The angels protect you,
And Heaven accept you.

May you have:
A world of wishes at your command
God and his angels close at hand
Friends and family their love impart,
And Irish blessings in you heart.

These things I warmly wish to you-
Someone to love
Some work to do
A bit o' sun
A bit o' cheer
And a guardian angel always near.

Here's to a long life and a merry one
A quick death and an easy one
A pretty girl and an honest one
A cold beer and another one!


May the lilt of lush laughter lighten ever road,
May the midst of Irish magic shorten every road.
May you taste the sweetest pleasures
that fortune ever bestowed,
And may all your friends remember
all the favours you are owed.
May your home always be too small to hold all your friends.
God is good, but never dance in a small boat.

May you live as long as you want,
And never want as long as you live.

If you're enough lucky to be Irish...
You're lucky enough!

'Tis better to buy a small bouquet
And give to your friend this very day,
Than a bushel of roses white and red
To lay on his coffin after he's dead.

For each petal on the shamrock
This brings a wish your way-
Good health, good luck, and happiness
For today and every day.

Dance as if no one were watching,
Sing as if no one were listening,
And live every day as if it were your last.

History or Legend.

 

True history and legend are intertwined when it comes to St. Patrick. 

Different tales tell of his standing upon a hill, using a wooden staff to drive the serpents into the sea, banishing them forever from the shores of Ireland. One legend says that one old serpent resisted, but the saint overcame it by cunning. He is said to have made a box and invited the reptile to enter. The snake insisted the box was too small and the discussion became very heated. Finally the snake entered the box to prove he was right, whereupon St Patrick slammed the lid and cast the box into the sea. While it is true there are no snakes in Ireland, chances are that there never have been since the time the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the ice age. As in many old pagan religions serpent symbols were common, and possibly even worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. Patrick is most known the world over for having driven the snakes from Ireland.

It is known that he was born Maewyn Succat in 387 Kirkpatrick Scotland or Britain depends and his father was Calpurniuson your source and was kidnapped by Irish raiders and sold in Ireland as a slave for Milcha in Dalaradia for around 6 years. He eventually fled from his cruel master and during a  vision in a dream he was led to God and he fled to Britain in ship.

 He became fluent in the Irish language before making his escape to the continent, to Gaul where for 12 years he studied under St Germaine the Bishop of Auxerre, at St Martin's monastery.  Eventually he was ordained as a deacon, then priest and finally as a bishop. Pope Celestine in Rome then sent him back to Ireland in the name Patercuis or Patritus to preach the gospel and convert the pagans to be Christians. 

Patrick was very successful in his conversions upsetting the Celtic locals. Evidently he was a great traveller, especially in Celtic countries, as innumerable places in Brittany, Cornwall, Wales, Scotland and Ireland are named after him. He establish many monasteries, churches and Educational facilities. He spent around 30 years in Ireland. He died March 17 in AD 460, AD 461, or AD 493 once again depends on your source and his grave is in St Bridget and St. Columbia, at Downpatrick, County Down. The jawbone of St. Patrick was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits and as a preservative against the evil eye. Another legend says St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Galstonbury Abbey. There is evidence of an Irish pilgrimage to his tomb during the reign of the Saxon King Ine in A.D. 688, when a group of pilgrims headed by St. Indractus were murdered.

 

 The Shamrock

At one time called the "Seamroy", symbolises the cross and blessed trinity. Before the Christian era it was a sacred plant of the Druids of Ireland because its leaves formed a triad. In the most simplest form he explained the Holy Trinity with the Shamrock. The well-known legend of the Shamrock connects it definitely to St. Patrick and his teaching. Preaching in the open air on the doctrine of the trinity, he is said to have illustrated the existence of the Three in One by plucking a shamrock from the grass growing at his feet and showing it to his congregation. The legend of the shamrock is also connected with that of the banishment of the serpent tribe from Ireland by a tradition that snakes are never seen on trefoil and that it is a remedy against the stings of snakes and scorpions. The trefoil in Arabia is called shamrakh and was sacred in Iran as an emblem of the Persian triads. The trefoil, as noted above, being a sacred plant among the Druids, and three being a mystical number in the Celtic religion as well as all others, it is probable that St. Patrick must have been aware of the significance of his illustration. For one final word from us about St. Patrick's Day and links to a few Irish sites of interest...

Some nice links